Fishing as Australia’s riskiest job

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Recent data from Safe Work Australia show that 114 Australians have been killed at work this year. There were 212 fatalities at work in 2012. According to the Key Work Health and Safety Statistics 2013 released by Safe Work Australia, agriculture, forestry, and fishing are the three most dangerous industries, where the last one is noted as the current riskiest job in Australia.

Fishing the riskiest job in Australia
Insurer’s point-of-view

Personal insurance providers consider applicants’ jobs as a key factor in assessing their insurance premiums. Fishermen and women typically receive high payable insurance premiums due to the high level of risk they face in their occupation.

According to lifeinsurancefinder.com.au, “working out at sea is widely known as the most dangerous job in the world, and 17 times more dangerous than mining.” This idea is supported by data from Safe Work Australia, which indicated that for every 100,000 workers in the fishing industry, 60 received injuries in 2010-2011. The fatality rate was equivalent to 16.47 per cent; almost double that of the second industry in the rank.

Ten riskiest jobs

Statistics show that fatalities in the workplace occur for all kinds of occupations, whether white or blue-collar. Based from consolidated data from 2013 records from several organisations, the following are the ten workers engaged in the most dangerous jobs in Australia:

Commercial fishermen and women – these workers work miles away and are often subject to storms and heavy rain;

Truckers – these workers face 10 times risk of dying while on the job due to possibly of crashes;

Farmers – these workers face different kinds of tough labour and danger every day;

Miners – exposed to explosions and toxic gases, 50 to 60 workers die each year in the mining industry;

Construction workers – 40 to 50 workers die every year in construction sites in Australia;

Tree loppers – these workers die due to unstable branches, chainsaws, and overhead electric wires;

Defence force – some of the dangers faced by police officers include assault, infectious disease, abuse, injury, and murder;

Firefighters – these workers are subject to dangers from asphyxiation and crashes to traumas and heart attacks;

Pilots – hazards faced by these workers include mechanical failures and weather disturbances, among others factors;

Garbage collectors – aside from road accidents, these workers are exposed to chemicals and toxins on a daily basis.

Common injuries

Records from Safe Work Australia show that from 2008 to 2011, three mechanisms of injury are prevalent in workplaces: vehicular accident, falls from a height, and being hit by falling or moving objects. The nature of injury or disease may be as mild burns, fractures, and deafness or as severe as mental disorder, dislocation, and disorder of the spinal vertebrae.

Safe Work Australia also has a separate collected data for mesothelioma, a type of cancer than infects the protective lining of internal organs. Records from the Australian Institute of Health and Welfare show that around 600 cases were diagnosed in 2007 and 2009. The Australian Bureau of Statistics reported 583 deaths in 2009 caused by this disease, which is expected to infect more workers in 2014 according to epidemiological projections.

 

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