Australians as consistently happy people

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Australia is a country inhabited by happy people, as revealed by the global study by the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD) and the national study by McCrindle Research. OECD used various indicators to determine the overall Better Life Index of the Australian population, while McCrindle used income levels as the only indicator. The following sums up what the research results say about the happiness level of Australians:

Happiness Barometer of Australia
Income-based happiness

McCrindle’s March 2013 report revealed the happiness barometer of the Australian population compared to the last five years. When asked how happy they are compared to the average Australian, 53% of the overall population said that they are equally happy, while 29% are more happy, and 17% are less happy.

When income is put into the equation and compared with that of an average Australian, 21% of the population that earn below US$49,000 thought that they were more happy, while 30% considered themselves less happy. Also, of those who earn more than US$80,000, 44% considered themselves more happy than five years ago, while 8% were less happy.

When viewed from a comparative perspective using measures like “very happy” and “not at all happy”, the happiness level of Australians tended to become lower when compared with the happiness and income of the average Australian. However, when asked to rate their happiness subjectively based on life satisfaction, well-being, and fulfilment, Australians who earn significantly less than average were significantly happier than average.

The report concludes that while income affects the level of happiness of Australians, earning more does not enhance the sense of happiness of the population.

Australians more happy that many other countries

The OECD report released in May 2013 revealed that Australians were more satisfied with their lives compared to the 80% global average. Particularly, 84% of Australians said that they experience positive feelings more in an average day than negative ones. In addition, 90% of Australians were more community-oriented, while the majority of the population participated in the democratic process.

According to OECD, income plays a vital role in perceiving life satisfaction, as it is “an important means to achieving higher living standards.”

Life satisfaction

The 2008 Household Income and Labour Dynamics in Australia (HILDA) Survey showed that more than half of the Australian population or 55% were satisfied with their overall life, while only 1% were not. Very satisfied Australians numbered 33%, while those not so satisfied with their lives were 11%. Australians were also noted to be either satisfied or very satisfied with different aspects of their life, such as safety, home, neighbourhood, job, health, free time, community involvement, and financial situation.

Effects of happiness

With Australians showing a general sense of satisfaction and happiness towards life, they are more likely to influence foreigners to travel to Australia to experience how it really is living or working in the 10th happiest country in 2013 according to the World Happiness Report released by Columbia University’s Earth Institute. In turn, this will be great for the country’s tourism economy, with migrant applications for visa to Australia expected to increase. By then, the Australian overall positive outlook becomes contagious, even helping the country grow as a result.

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