Common pathways to Permanent Residency via a Skilled Visa

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As many of you may be aware, obtaining permanent residency in Australia can be a challenging and complex thing to do. In this month’s article I provide a brief overview of some of the most common pathways for skilled workers to get permanent residency in Australia, and I highlight a couple of points applicants commonly misunderstand.

The first thing to note is that there are currently two (2) main ‘direct to permanent’ visa under the Skilled Migration Visa Program:

  1. The Skilled Independent Visa (Subclass 189) – this is for applicants who are not sponsored by an employer, family member or Australian state or Territory government.
  2. The Skilled Sponsored Visa (Subclass 190) – this visa is for applicants who are sponsored (nominated) by an Australian State or Territory government.

What if I cannot meet the requirements for one of these visas?

Some applicants are not immediately eligible for permanent residence. This could be for a variety or combination of reasons such as not having enough work experience, not being able to get a high enough IELTS (English) score or they cannot get permanent visa state sponsorship (nomination). The main problem in this type of scenario is not that the applicant does not have the skills or experience; it’s that they don’t quite pass the points test – they may miss out by a small amount (5 points).

However, what many applicants don’t understand is that they could still be eligible to apply for another type of skilled visa, the provisional subclass 489 visa. This visa is for applicants who can be sponsored either by an Australian State or Territory government or possibly even by a family member (depending on your occupation).

The two main differences with this visa are:

  • It is a provisional visa (4 years) which leads to a permanent skilled visa once certain criteria are met;
  • It is conditional on the applicant living and working only in a ‘regional’ or ‘designated’ area of Australia while holding this visa.

One of the really interesting things about this is just how many parts of Australia are ‘regional’ or ‘designated’. Many people think you must live out in the outback with this visa – that’s not actually the case. There are many capital cities in Australia (such as Perth, Adelaide and Melbourne to name a few) which are classed as either ‘Regional’ or ‘Designated’.

Once an applicant has a subclass 489 visa approved they may then be able to apply for permanent residency provided that they:

  • have lived in the specified regional area for at least two years, and
  • have worked in a specified regional area for at least one year, and
  • have complied with the conditions on their visa.

Another interesting point to note (and something which many applicants misunderstand) is that you don’t have to work in your nominated occupation to meet the requirements for the permanent stage. You can actually work in any occupation you choose and still meet permanent visa requirements.

This visa is a fantastic option for many people who may have given up on their dream of moving to Australia. You may find that you could in fact be eligible for a skilled visa.

Would you like to know if you qualify for a Skilled Visa?

You can start the process here by taking a free online assessment:

http://www.nationalvisas.com.au/services/freeonlineassessment.htm

I look forward to helping you turn your Australian permanent residence dream into a reality. As a migrant to Australia myself (I am from Mexico and arrived in Australia on a skilled visa) I really understand just how important your visa application is to you.

National Visas’ registered migration agents are skilled, dedicated migration professionals – we’d love to help you achieve your dream.

Regards,

Alfonso Varela
Migration Advisor
MARN: 1278626

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Alfonso Varela

Migration Advisor at National Visas
As a migrant to Australia myself, I really understand just how important your visa application is to you and your family.

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